The development of GNU, started in January 1984, is known as the GNU Project.

Many of the programs in GNU are released under the auspices of the GNU Project; those we call GNU packages.

The name “GNU” is a recursive acronym for “GNU's Not Unix.” “GNU” is pronounced .

predating-90

GNU/Linux is used by millions, though many call it “Linux” by mistake.

GNU's own kernel, The Hurd, was started in 1990 (before Linux was started).

Volunteers continue developing the Hurd because it is an interesting technical project.

GNU is an operating system that is free software—that is, it respects users' freedom.

The development of GNU made it possible to use a computer without software that would trample your freedom.

We recommend installable versions of GNU (more precisely, GNU/Linux distributions) which are entirely free software. The free software movement campaigns to win for the users of computing the freedom that comes from free software.Free software puts its users in control of their own computing.Non-free software puts its users under the power of the software's developer. Free software means the users have the freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software. To understand the concept, you should think of “free” as in “free speech”, not as in “free beer”.More precisely, free software means users of a program have the four essential freedoms: Developments in technology and network use have made these freedoms even more important now than they were in 1983.Nowadays the free software movement goes far beyond developing the GNU system.See the Free Software Foundation's web site for more about what we do, and a list of ways you can help. That means it is a collection of many programs: applications, libraries, developer tools, even games.