So whenever anyone makes changes to the original workbook that affects the chart, the Word document displays the latest version.You will, however, encounter difficulties if you need to send the document to someone else, because Word needs the worksheet to display the chart.So, if you simply send the Word document and don’t send the Excel worksheet – the chart won't appear in the document.

When you embed an Excel chart in a Word document, the entire Excel workbook is embedded inside the Word document.

This makes the Word document much larger but it does ensure that if you send the Word document to someone, the Excel workbook goes with it.

The downside of embedding is that you no longer have a link between the chart in the Word document and the original workbook stored on your disk.

One nice thing about Microsoft Office applications is that they’ve been designed to talk to each other.

For example, you can take an Excel chart and place it in a Word document to illustrate a report.

While the process of putting an Excel chart in a Word document is simple, there are three ways that you can do it.

Which option you choose will affect how portable the document is and how easy the chart is to update.

The terms that Microsoft uses for putting an object from one application inside another are linking and embedding.

When you link a chart from an Excel worksheet to a Word document, the link that refers to the chart in the Word document.