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The V sign is a hand gesture in which the index and middle fingers are raised and parted, while the other fingers are clenched.

It has various meanings, depending on the cultural context and how it is presented.

When displayed with the palm inward towards the signer, it has long been an offensive gesture in some Commonwealth nations.

In the 1940s, during World War II, a campaign by the Western Allies to use the sign with the back of the hand towards the signer ( in Unicode) as a "V for Victory" sign proved quite effective.

During the Vietnam War, in the 1960s, the "V sign" was widely adopted by the counterculture as a symbol of peace.

Shortly thereafter, it also became adopted as a gesture used in photographs, especially in Japan.

As an example of the V sign (palm inward) as an insult, on November 1, 1990, The Sun, a British tabloid, ran an article on its front page with the headline "Up Yours, Delors" next to a large hand making a V sign protruding from a Union Jack cuff.

The Sun urged its readers to stick two fingers up at then President of the European Commission Jacques Delors, who had advocated an EU central government.

The article attracted a number of complaints about its alleged racism, but the now defunct Press Council rejected the complaints after the editor of The Sun stated that the paper reserved the right to use vulgar abuse in the interests of Britain.

On April 3, 2009, Scottish football players Barry Ferguson and Allan Mc Gregor were permanently banned from the Scottish national squad for showing the V sign while sitting on the bench during the game against Iceland.